Raspberry Pi 4 Assembly

As an Amazon affiliate, I will earn a commission on any products purchased by following links
from this site. My commission does not affect the price you pay for the product. It does, however, enable me to continue my work of bringing affordable
computers, accessible to the blind, to everyone everywhere.

Do you want this F123Light enabled Raspberry Pi 4 Cana Kit but don’t want to build it yourself? Let me do all the hard work for you!





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The new Raspberry Pi 4 Cana Kit is very similar, as far as assembly goes, to the 3B+ version. To assemble your Raspberry Pi 4 Cana Kit, open the box that contains the components. There are several things inside the box that you can lay aside initially. The power switch, the USB card reader, the fan, and assorted paper items. The items of interest for assembling the kit are 3 boxes. One box contains the power adapter, which you will not need right away, a second box contains the board, which you will need, and the third box contains the case. There is a small bag with a zip lock top that contains three heatsinks. You will need the heatsinks while assembling the Pi, so put them where you can find them easily.

Take the case for the pi, face the three holes on the end toward your body. The case disassembles into three parts. Lay the top aside, lay the middle aside, and position the bottom in front of you. Position the board into the bottom of the box. It goes in at a light angle.

Place the middle of the case back over the bottom and press down until it clicks into place. It does not require a lot of force.

Take the bag with the heatsinks, find the largest heatsink, then in the case, find near the middle of the board, a small square depression starting toward the back, facing away from you. Inside the depression you should feel another square. Peal the paper off the back of the largest heatsink and center it in the depression over the square in its middle.

The second heatsink goes in the smaller hole moving toward you, there is a small divider you can feel on the left side of the board. This divider points almost directly at the second square for the heatsink. You will feel a small hold with another raised bit in the middle of it. Remove the paper from the adhesive on the heatsink and place it as close to centered as you can in the hole over the square.

The third, and final heatsink is the most difficult. There is not a wall that separates the case of the pi from the USB ports as can be felt in the Pi 3 case. Instead, the case has a lip at the top, and your fingers can go under that. The third, and smallest heatsink is in line with the other two, this one is closest to you, and you should be able to feel where it goes. Try to center it as best as you can. The Pi 4 definitely needs its heatsinks and its fan.

In the video, we turn the pi around 180 degrease to attach the fan. So, the instructions will be given the same here. Hopefully they will be more clear here than on the video. This was our first time assembling one, and there may be some confusion on the video.

make sure the USB ports and Ethernet ports are facing away from you now. You should feel a raised ridge of pins on the left side of the pi. You need to attach the fan to the pins on the left most row. To make sure you have the correct wires, use your finger to spin the fan blades. When you have found the blades, lay that side down, with the wires facing toward you. Make sure the wires are not tangled, and come straight out of the bottom of the fan toward your body. The wire on the right is the positive, and the one on the left is the negative.

Attach the fan by skipping the pin closest to you. The second pin is the positive connection, and the third pin is the negative. Be prepared to spend quite a bit of time attaching this. If you do it right, you will be able to tell because you can hear the buzz of the fan, feel the pi vibrate while it is running, and the Pi will not feel warm. If it does not come on, the pi will feel quite warm to the touch. In that case, you can try to reattach it. Be gentle while pushing the connectors down onto the pins. The wires end in cube like connectors. Press the connectors onto the pins to form the connection.

The final step is to place the top on the case. It should go on with little or no pressure. Voila, you have assembled your F123Light enabled Raspberry Pi 4. All you need to do now is grab the latest F123Light image, and put it on your 32GB micro SD card included with the kit.

With the pi fully assembled in front of you, if you placed the openings in the case on your left, the ports starting closest to you on your left side are four USB, Ethernet, then on the side away from you audio jack, two micro HDMI slots, and a USBC. The USBC is the spot where the power button and power adapter attach. On the right side, at the very bottom in the middle is a slot where the Micro SD card is inserted. The lip on the Micro SD card that aids in gripping it for removal should be facing down when you insert the card into the slot.

To learn more about F123Light, click here.

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F123Light Enabled Raspberry Pi 3 B+ Cana Kit

As an Amazon affiliate, I will earn a commission on any products purchased by following links
from this site. My commission does not affect the price you pay for the product. It does, however, enable me to continue my work of bringing affordable
computers, accessible to the blind, to everyone everywhere.

Do you want this F123Light enabled Raspberry Pi Cana Kit but don’t want to build it yourself? Let me do all the hard work for you!





Follow Along On Youtube

to assemble your Raspberry Pi Cana Kit, open the box that contains the components. There are several things inside the box that you can lay aside initially. The power switch, the USB card reader, and assorted paper items. The items of interest for assembling the kit are 3 boxes. One box contains the power adapter, which you will not need right away, a second box contains the board, which you will need, and the third box contains the case. There is a small bag with a zip lock top that contains two squarish objects. These objects are the heatsinks. You will need the heatsinks while assembling the Pi, so put them where you can find them easily.

Take the case for the pi, face the three holes on the end to your left. The case disassembles into three parts. Lay the top aside, lay the middle aside, and position the bottom in front of you. Position the board into the bottom of the box. It goes in at a light angle.

Place the middle of the case back over the bottom and press down until it clicks into place. It does not require a lot of force.

Take the bag with the heatsinks, find the largest heatsink, then in the case, find near the middle of the board, a small square depression. Inside the depression you should feel another square. Peal the paper off the back of the largest heatsink and center it in the depression over the square in its middle.

The second heatsink goes in the smaller hole on the left, it is right up against the wall where the board gets larger. You will feel a small hold with another raised bit in the middle of it. Remove the paper from the adhesive on the heatsink and place it as close to centered as you can in the hole over the square.

The final step is to place the top on the case. It should go on with little or no pressure. Voila, you have assembled your F123Light enabled Raspberry Pi. All you need to do now is grab the latest F123Light image, and put it on your 32GB micro SD card included with the kit.

With the pi fully assembled in front of you, if you placed the openings in the case on your left, the ports starting closest to you on your left side are four USB, Ethernet, then on the side away from you audio jack, HDMI slot, and Micro USB. The Micro USB is the spot where the power button and power adapter attach. On the right side, at the very bottom in the middle is a slot where the Micro SD card is inserted. The lip on the Micro SD card that aids in gripping it for removal should be facing down when you insert the card into the slot.

To learn more about F123Light, click here.

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